Cheerful Heart

I have here an email from a woman named Ellen, in Elko, Nevada, who writes:

“Your writing used to be very funny, but in the last few months it seems more reflective and almost sad. Sean, I have come to depend on your stuff to make me laugh, but lately you haven’t been doing your job! LOL! I’m just wondering if you’ll ever go back to being funny again!”

Ellen, I’ll be the first to admit that it’s been tough finding humor in daily life since the pandemic hit. I hope I haven’t been too much of a buzzkill for you, I’m sorry if I have.

Humor is just one of those things that feels “off” when used at the wrong time. I’ve found that sometimes gags which are hysterical one day, can feel very impolite under the wrong circumstances.

Case in point: Once I was building a shed. My wife was my construction assistant. My wife and I have always had a running joke between us where I “goose” her when she’s not looking.

Goosing is of course pinching someone’s hindquarters. This is not to be confused with “Christmas goosing,” which is sneaking up behind your cousin and pulling down his pants in public. Both are classic moves.

So one day my wife and I were building this shed, pounding nails with hammers. All of a sudden, my wife gets silent and turns her back to me.

I’m thinking she’s taking a break, maybe catching her breath. But little do I know that she has just smacked her thumb with a hammer and is crying silently, grasping her swollen thumbnail, which is now about the size of a grapefruit.

That’s when I sneak up behind her and goose her.

What happened next would live in local folklore for years to come, and is still talked about in many circles. I will leave out the violent details involving how she injured me, and I’ll simply warn you to never goose a woman who wields a hammer.

So we can see here that humor is not always funny. In fact, poorly timed jokes are the opposite of funny and are responsible for blunt force traumatic injuries.

And that’s how things have felt during this epidemic. It’s been difficult finding things to chuckle at when everyone’s proverbial thumbs have been hit with a hammer.

A few days ago, I actually sat down to write something lighthearted. I was going to write about Floridian yellow flies, which are always good for a laugh. Anyone who has ever spent any time in West Florida knows that our yellow flies are big enough to qualify for GEICO auto insurance.

No sooner had I written two paragraphs than I received a call from a friend. My friend was telling me all the updates on Florida’s COVID-19 front.

My pal explained how for the last few days Florida has been reporting record highs of coronavirus cases. And it’s expected to get worse over the next few weeks. Then he told me that the mother of a mutual friend had died.

Immediately I felt horrible for writing humorously about Florida when so many people are getting sick. Thus, I abandoned my casual tone and changed the main thrust of my column.

But by then it was too late. I had sort of lost my inspiration altogether. After a few hours of editing, I just tossed it into the trash.

I guess what I’m saying is: I have no idea what I’m doing right now. Most days, I’m not even sure whether I’m fully awake.

All I know is that this has been the weirdest four months of my life, and I don’t think it’s going to be over any time soon. I wish there were something I could do, but I’m in the same boat everyone else is in. I have not changed out of my pajamas more than twice within the last 90 days.

When the pandemic hit, my wife and I were on a mini tour, doing my one-man show in different towns each night. When the tour was cancelled, it only took a few minutes to start packing and head for home. Then life went into suspension mode.

I remember that car trip back to Florida. I was thinking to myself, “Okay, Sean, this is gonna be a tough time, but stay cheerful, and maybe—just MAYBE—you can help others feel cheerful too.”

I gave myself this little pep talk, hoping it would help. But deep inside I genuinely doubted whether my written words could actually help anyone feel better.

Certainly, I attempt to make people feel better with words, and sometimes I attempt to make people laugh with words. Sometimes I even use words to crack jokes about small-towns, Jello salad, dogs, and about how a Baptist’s favorite whiskey brand is Vicks NyQuil.

But the truth is, I’m as human as the next guy and these words you are reading are just pixels on a screen.

So I’m running out of room here, but before I end this column, I want to apologize for letting you down, Ellen. Really, I do. I will do my best to stay lighthearted and cheer you up. The last thing I want to do is make you sad. I also hope that you can stay buoyant during this tough time, and maybe even help your friends and family laugh.

But take it from me, first make absolutely sure they aren’t holding a hammer.

69 comments

  1. Christina - June 16, 2020 6:39 am

    I just appreciate your genuineness, Sean. What you have offered to us in these months is treasure.

    Reply
  2. Char - June 16, 2020 7:34 am

    I love the pictures you create with your words. I step into the picture knowing I will cry, smile, laugh and remember the days gone by long ago when I was a child.
    I cried over Reese, I smiled because of what you gave his loved ones, I laughed about the blueberries because it made me remember my own blueberry picking story. I don’t just read your writings, I step into them.
    With all my heart, I say thank you. Char

    Reply
  3. SueAnne - June 16, 2020 10:06 am

    I agree with the lady above. I’m new to your writings. I have been blessed by them. I too appreciate your openness. It makes me know im not alone in the way I feel which most days is like, “is this real”?
    So thank you for being you.
    God bless.

    Reply
  4. Maureen - June 16, 2020 10:53 am

    Your columns these past few months have been filled with stories of hope and goodness. And as always, some make me laugh and tear me up in the same reading. I have shared more of them these past few weeks than in the past year. Keep doing what you do Sean, you are great at it.

    Reply
  5. carol0goodson - June 16, 2020 11:21 am

    I don’t care what you write about: I always love it because the genuine, warm human being behind the words is what I need. In the midst of all the bad news I read about and feel keenly, my touchstones are people like you, who help me remember that God is truly still in the world among us, showing me His love through the wonderful people He has sent into my life.

    Reply
  6. Ann - June 16, 2020 11:26 am

    Sean, your columns always make me feel like there is still a real world out there…you usually find some way to make me chuckle…or lol..but your sensitivity and view of things we are not even aware of is huge!.,….keep those words on your finger tips ( not Jamie’s rear) ….you are comforting and inspiring…thank you!

    Reply
  7. Cynthia Harmon - June 16, 2020 11:32 am

    You’re real, Sean. That’s what I love about you. Keep writing and recording your podcast. We need you even more in this unsettling time.

    Reply
  8. Suzanne Cahill - June 16, 2020 11:34 am

    I appreciate the honesty in your writing, regardless of the subject. For all the times your essays have made me laugh, and for all the times they made me think, and for all the times I was moved to tears-THANK YOU.

    Reply
  9. Sue Rhodus - June 16, 2020 11:40 am

    I agree with SueAnn. I guess we ” Sue’s” think similar thoughts. Things I notice here in Kentucky is that young people are getting out in nature. Social distancing in fresh air. That’s all good. We older folks are reflecting more on better times of our youth. That’s all good.

    Reply
  10. Keloth Anne - June 16, 2020 11:40 am

    Your writings have been a Special blessing these past 95 days (but who’s counting)
    You give hope and love and always make it so personal—-truly touching my heart and somehow the world seems a little more bearable!! Hang in there and you and Jamie stay healthy
    Much love♥️♥️

    Reply
  11. Sarah Nash - June 16, 2020 11:52 am

    Hi Sean! I know what you mean about simply not feeling lighthearted, but maybe these two stories will give a little nuttiness to the day!!!

    My daughter was born in October, 1973. Recently at a children’s birthday party venue, she was asked to give her birthdate; so she said as usual, “ten, twenty-two, seventy-three. The ticket issued replied “is that nineteen?” I’m sure you can imagine the look on her face!!!

    Ex-husband, with whom I’m good friends, seemed to have some kind of heart issue; so doctor has given him a monitor to wear for one month, under his shirt. He woke up early recently and went to the kitchen to make coffee. In that process, he began to feel lightheaded and headed straight into dining room to sit. Wife still in bed asleep, and he couldn’t make her hear him calling for help. He did the next best thing and pushed the panic button on the monitor. Almost immediately he heard the phone ring and wife answering, then he heard shocked questions from her. Next she came boiling out of the bedroom screaming his name and couldn’t find him because by that time, he was crawling from dining room to den recliner! Congratulations to the monitor people for their quick action!

    I look forward to your column every single morning!

    Reply
  12. Lynn - June 16, 2020 11:55 am

    Don’t change a thing. Write happy things. Write sobering things. Write reflective things. The world appears to be at an empathy deficit. Continue to feed us things from your heart. Thank you for keeping it real.

    Reply
  13. Jan - June 16, 2020 11:55 am

    While I appreciate your sense of humor and love of honest fun, there is so much to enjoy about your writing and your love of people in addition to your “fun side”. These are strange and difficult times and you are helping me and so many others to navigate a way through them. Thank you!

    Reply
  14. Laura Rush - June 16, 2020 12:02 pm

    Mr. Dietrich , (I would call you Sean, but thought you might feel more esteemed if i addressed you formally). I just found you about a month or so ago. Emily Freeman shared one of your links. I subscribed and forwarded to friends and look forward to your column every day. Well, I’ve missed a few and it takes a level of self control to not sit here and read every one I missed. You write with such transparency and human-ness that is so absent in social media.I am in my forties and am still trying to figure out how to have a healthy relationship/purpose with social media… I kinda hate it. So I love your column. It is thoughtful, appropriately humorous and leaves a warm feeling in my heart for humanity. It also reminds me that I am not alone in my feelings of inadequacies or stupid mistakes. I hope you keep writing for a long time. Thank you for sharing your gift!

    Reply
  15. KAT - June 16, 2020 12:12 pm

    💕 Sean, You speak from your heart and that is why we are so drawn to you and can relate to you. Never apologize for putting into words the way you feel, the way we all feel. Here’s to keeping it real💕

    Reply
  16. Susan A. Royal - June 16, 2020 12:15 pm

    You can laugh and cry at the same time. I’ve been doing it all my life. In good times and in bad. Even during a pandemic. Your blog does that for me. I read it first thing every morning. It makes my day.

    Reply
  17. Phil S. - June 16, 2020 12:42 pm

    Sean, I hope today’s column helped Ellen and any others who may be feeling somewhat melancholy these days. You have a unique gift of being able to make people feel sad, happy, and worth something all at the same time, and you always end your message on a cheerful note. Keep hammering away, my friend.
    BTW, I know what you mean about injecting humor in the wrong spot. I once made the mistake of goosing my wife while she was peeling potatoes with a kitchen knife.

    Reply
  18. Ginger - June 16, 2020 12:56 pm

    You keep writing from your heart and we will benefit. You are writing for us as emotional moving targets. You are surely allowed emotional ups and downs, too. Let’s just all keep our seatbelts on. It’s a wild ride. You are loved, Sean. Please change your pjs a little more often.

    Reply
  19. Joyce - June 16, 2020 1:10 pm

    Thank you, Sean. Sometimes you make me laugh and cry. And I need both! Especially now. And don’t worry. My cat thinks you’re funny!

    Reply
  20. Maxine - June 16, 2020 1:13 pm

    Sean you’ve done it again. You can manage to be serious. very serious and still bring a smile to our face. It makes all the difference in the world to know we are not alone in our weird thoughts about all that is going on in this planet we call home right now. Thank you.

    Reply
  21. Paula Massey - June 16, 2020 1:14 pm

    Your writings are a treasure!

    Reply
  22. TonJa Wilder - June 16, 2020 1:51 pm

    Sean you have never let me down. Yes your writings have taken on a different attitude but you are writing about what is prevalent in today’s society. You are speaking the truth. You can’t change truth no more than you can change history. ( Sorry, my attempt at a Seanism.)
    God Bless you, Jamie, and the Pups. I can not wait till you are back on the road again…I need another hug.

    Reply
  23. Martha Barnett - June 16, 2020 1:54 pm

    Sean, thank you. It’s not your responsibility to make my day and do it the way I think I need it to be done. Be yourself- your real brave self that keeps putting out there where your heart is. Your book kept me crying and laughing, both, all the way through. You are gifted! Thank you for giving us yourself. Blessings on you and your wife Jamie who is a saint for sure!

    Reply
  24. Martha Barnett - June 16, 2020 1:55 pm

    Sean, thank you. It’s not your responsibility to make my day and do it the way I think I need it to be done. Be yourself- your real brave self that keeps putting out there where your heart is. Your book kept me crying and laughing, both, all the way through. You are gifted! Thank you for giving us yourself. Blessings on you and your wife Jamie who is a saint for sure!

    Reply
  25. Lisa Martin - June 16, 2020 1:58 pm

    I too have noticed a more somber tone in your writing but appreciate that you are feeling what we are all feeling. Which is not knowing how to feel.

    Reply
  26. Joan J - June 16, 2020 2:09 pm

    Sean….sometimes things come into your life just when you need them the most! Before the pandemic hit I had on my list a book to order that looked interesting. I had seen an ad for it on instagram and wrote it down for when I had more time to read. That book was “Stars of Alabama”. By an author named Sean Dietrich. During the particularly scarey first days of the pandemic I ordered the book and hid away amidst the pages. Needless to say I loved the book and immediately ordered “will the circle be unbroken”… I was hooked on this new author…who had the most honest and authentic way of writing. So…..I then have been reading everything I can that you write. (Reading too much “news” was driving me into a dark place.) I’ve told anyone who would listen about you. They are all feeling the same way about your work. Yes…..Your blog is the first thing I look for every morning….your podcast makes fridays an extra special.day of the week. You write from your heart and so many times put words to what we are all feeling. When this thing passes…and it will…..I am looking for tickets to your tour and showing up with all my other new Sean Dietrich fans. Hang in there Sean and Jamie….as my Father always liked to say….”the good times don’t last but neither do the bad”.

    Reply
  27. Joanie Pelszynska - June 16, 2020 2:17 pm

    In these strange times of pandemic, unexpected gifts are found; the unheard of ability to sit on the front porch with a cup of coffer at 10 am on a Tuesday morning, the delight on the dog’s face as he follows me from room to room, neighbors who have hibernated in their homes for years, now waiving across the cul de sac and a random post on Facebook where a friend shared one of your columns. Read it, cleared the lump in my throat, hunted down my husband and read it to him. We both sat and searched Facebook until we found your page. Like children on Christmas morning, we opened treasure after treasure. We sat in the living room giddy with delight, reading and sharing columns. I don’t recall reading anything funny, just thoughtful, genuine, relatable pieces that said ‘hey, you’re not alone, we’re all in this together, remember when…?’ So thank you for that. I really don’t need funny, connectivity is the foundation of hope. I hope to pick blueberries someday with my husband, hope to be counted among the people who help others and hope there will be a celebration waiting for me at the pearly gates too.

    Reply
  28. Lisa Snow - June 16, 2020 2:43 pm

    Sean, your words, whether deeply touching,
    giggle producing or both, are a buoy in this
    sea of uncertainty surrounding us all. Please
    keep pouring out your wonderful words of wisdom
    and love! We all love you!

    Reply
  29. Marge - June 16, 2020 2:54 pm

    Dear Sean, Please keep doing what you are doing! When reading your daily postings, it feels like I’m talking to a friend. This pandemic is difficult; the daily news saddens me and I feel anxious… but I can count on you to bring real life each and every day! I thank you from the bottom of my ❤️

    Reply
  30. oldlibrariansshelf - June 16, 2020 2:56 pm

    Thanks, Sean, for just continuing to write during the shutdown. You are a friend to us, pajamas and all! 😉

    Reply
  31. Kristi W - June 16, 2020 3:56 pm

    Sean – I look forward every day to your column and truly appreciate your story-telling ability. I hope when things open up again and you are back on the road that you will have an opportunity to come to the Kansas City area to speak. I would love to come see you and thank you in person for your ability to bring me laughs and tears. (Yes, I live on the Kansas side and hope you will not hold that against me!) Oh – almost forgot to mention, just finished your book (Will the Circle be Unbroken) and loved it. T

    Reply
  32. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 4:27 pm

    I know what you’re doing: making me feel better through your funny, poignant, or profound stories. Your written words can do that for me and more than 30,000 “fans” and “followers”. Reflect on this from one of Helen Keller’s friends: “I am only one, But still I am one. I cannot do everything. But still I can do something. And because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do the something that I can do.” You, Sean Dietrich, have done many good “somethings” for me. Now, what can I do for you?

    Reply
  33. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 4:34 pm

    I know what you’re doing: making me feel better through your funny, poignant, or profound stories. Your written words can do that for me and 30,000-plus “fans” and “followers”. Reflect on this from one of Helen Keller’s friends: “I am only one, But still I am one. I cannot do everything. But still I can do something; And because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do.” You, Sean Dietrich, have done many good “somethings” for me. Now, what can I do for you?

    Reply
  34. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 4:39 pm

    I know what you’re doing: making me feel better through your funny, poignant, or profound stories. Your written words can do that for me and 30,000-plus “fans” and “followers”. Reflect on this from one of Helen Keller’s friends: “I am only one. But still I am one. I cannot do everything. But still I can do something; And because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do.” You, Sean Dietrich, have done many good “somethings” for me. Now, what can I do for you?

    Reply
  35. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 4:39 pm

    I’ve tried to leave a comment 3 times, but they all failed to post…what happened?

    Reply
  36. Mark Pollish - June 16, 2020 4:40 pm

    Sean – Love your sense of humor. This pandemic is no laughing matter. Neither was the one in 1968. That one took out up to 4 million in the world and about 100,000 in the U.S. It lasted into 1970. Only difference we did not get quarantined or wear masks. Heck, we even we through with Woodstock in 69 and never thought of wearing masks or clothes for that matter! Social distancing? No way – We got together as one big happy family. Solomon once said “History merely repeats itself. It has all been done before. Nothing under the sun is truly new.”

    Reply
  37. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 4:41 pm

    I’ve tried to post my comment 3 times, but it hasn’t posted yet. Is there an internet problem?

    Reply
  38. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 4:42 pm

    my comments haven’t posted after 3 tries, so is there an internet problem?

    Reply
  39. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 4:43 pm

    I’ve had some problems in getting my comments posted this morning….has anyone else?

    Reply
  40. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 4:46 pm

    trying to post again

    Reply
  41. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 4:48 pm

    My comments have not been posted after several tries. Is there an internet problem?

    Reply
  42. Mark Pollish - June 16, 2020 4:49 pm

    Mark Pollish – June 16, 2020 4:40 pm edited version

    Sean – Love your sense of humor. This pandemic is no laughing matter. Neither was the one in 1968. That one took out up to 4 million in the world and about 100,000 in the U.S. It lasted into 1970. Only difference was we did not get quarantined or wear masks. Heck, we even went through with Woodstock in 69 and never thought of wearing masks or clothes for that matter! Social distancing? No way – We got together as one big happy family. Solomon once said “History merely repeats itself. It has all been done before. Nothing under the sun is truly new.”

    Reply
  43. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 4:52 pm

    I’ve tried to post a comment several times, but it hasn’t posted….is there an internet problem?

    Reply
  44. Paige Byrne - June 16, 2020 4:57 pm

    Hi Sean,

    Can relate to your thoughts on writing. Creating art right now is certainly influenced by current times. I would love to paint the story of two young fisherman at Honey Hole. Did you happen to see that question about a picture? Thank you, Paige

    Reply
  45. Carla Ames - June 16, 2020 5:04 pm

    Hi Sean, I just began following you a couple months ago after a friend shared one of your writings and I’ve been delighted ever since. I anticipate opening my in-box every morning – sometimes I laugh, sometimes I cry, sometimes my heart is full, sometimes my mind, for learning some new little something – but always, I’m grateful because I “sure needed that”. You see, I won’t complain (as there’s plenty of that going around) but life is hard for so many right now, myself included. I’m almost 60, working full time and now in my second year of guardianship of 3 grandkids, 6, 5, 3, because their drug addicted parents just can’t get it together. Covid hit and it’s made challenges even more adventuresome. But I have too many blessings to dwell on all that could be/should be better. I’m grateful for a good job and grateful to able to love little ones who didn’t deserve to be in the hell they were. I confess I really miss getting to be the fun grandparent… I’m not sure how this story will end, but I’m hanging onto hope and strength, and fighting for these little souls because our future is before us. And one day when life slows down a bit, I’m hoping to delve into some of your books and maybe even get lucky enough to catch a show when those resume – and they will resume. While I can’t affirm if your writings are more melancholic than before, I can say they are just right for this ole girl. Hang in there and please keep writing.

    Reply
  46. Robin E Goldsmith - June 16, 2020 5:25 pm

    Just reading the written word makes me feel better. Not many people write their feelings anymore. It’s good to get them off your chest and if it can make someone laugh or have a memory of something or care about something you’ve done your job.

    Reply
  47. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 5:51 pm

    I know what you’re doing: making me feel better through your funny, poignant, or profound stories. Your written words can do that for me and 30,000-plus “fans” and “followers”. Reflect on this from one of Helen Keller’s friends: “I am only one, But still I am one. I cannot do everything; And because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do.” You, Sean Dietrich, have done many good “somethings” for me. Now, what can I do for you?

    Reply
  48. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 5:53 pm

    my comments are not appearing on this page….is there an internet problem/?

    Reply
  49. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 6:05 pm

    I’ve had some problems posting my comment today, so I’m trying again.

    Reply
  50. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 6:06 pm

    comment posting

    Reply
  51. Becky Souders - June 16, 2020 6:09 pm

    Even your more somber columns are comforting…. attesting to that is the recent one about Reese Loggins. It was not just comforting, but thought-provoking and gave me solace concerning my own losses. Your apologizing for being serious and insightful in these times is just as uplifting as your humor. Don’t stop. Your gift is shared. Lucky you!

    Reply
  52. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 6:10 pm

    another try….anyone else having problems with their comments not being posted?

    Reply
  53. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 6:28 pm

    my comments are not being posted….checking again

    Reply
  54. Harriet - Atlanta. - June 16, 2020 6:41 pm

    Funny or sad you always make my day. I like how your writing is REAL.

    Reply
  55. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 6:43 pm

    l

    Reply
  56. Robert M Brenner - June 16, 2020 7:41 pm

    GREAT column and I mean great!! Sean, you made my day with the line “the favorite brand of Baptist Whiskey was Vick’s NyQuil”! Now that was funny 😄. Thanks for being responsible for a good day, starting with a laugh out loud moment. Bob

    Reply
  57. Margaret E Odell - June 16, 2020 7:50 pm

    Sean, My husband and I learned early in our marriage not to do construction together. So, that story about your wife, the goose and the hammer really made me chuckle. Stay safe, be well and please keep writing!

    Reply
  58. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 8:29 pm

    trying again

    Reply
  59. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 8:32 pm

    I know what you’ve been doing: making me feel better through your funny, poignant, profound stories. Your written words can do that for 60,000 “fans” and “followers”. But my words to you haven’t been posting today, so I’ll try again.

    Reply
  60. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 8:47 pm

    My comments won’t appear.

    Reply
  61. Marilyn Cooper. - June 16, 2020 8:52 pm

    I just want to say thank you, Sean. I have been enjoying your column in the Lifestyles Section of the Palatka Daily News. The article about haircuts was very timely for me to send to my son, who had just gotten his hair “cut/ styled” 😂 by one of his daughters! His wife took over but it was too late! Seeing him on FaceTime gave me a start! Fortunately he is working from home now, and I assured him it will grow! Thank you again!

    Reply
  62. Linda Moon - June 16, 2020 9:37 pm

    WELL……after several messages between Gravatar and me, my post got “fixed” and showed up – MANY TIMES – along with all my complaints! The original one is at 4:27, so sorry for taking up all this nonsense here! Thank you, Gravatar, and my apologies to Sean of the South and all you readers!

    Reply
  63. Eddy - June 17, 2020 12:41 am

    We love Y’all Sean and Jamey (sp?)! So glad we got to meet and greet and get HUGS IN before this dang pandemic. 🚫 Hammers!!

    Reply
  64. Curtis Lee Zeitelhack - June 17, 2020 9:57 am

    Ellen needs to tone-down her demand that you be the sole provider of laughter in her life. You definitely help in that department – even in this time of pandemic isolation – but I think we all need to find smiles and laughter beyond your wonderful daily blog. We all need to be trying to make ourselves and others smile and laugh. If we can do that, even a few times per week, we’ll be doing our share to make the world a tad better. No doubt the world needs more smiles right now.

    Reply
  65. Ralph - June 17, 2020 1:05 pm

    Sean: enough of the poor me hermit! Lots of places and things to do-use common sense! Get on with life buddy! Hit your finger w a hammer!

    Reply
  66. Nancy M - June 17, 2020 2:59 pm

    Linda Moon, I’m glad you finally succeeded, big time! I enjoy your comments. I always read Sean’s fans’ comments. 💞😊

    Reply
  67. Nancy M - June 17, 2020 3:05 pm

    Keep on keeping on, Sean. Funny and/or thoughtful, it’s all good and just what I need.

    You were to have a book signing in Montgomery where we live, and we wanted to go, but the news about the pandemic kept getting worse and we decided we shouldn’t be out in crowds anymore. I look forward to when it’s safe for you to travel again. We’ll be there!

    Reply
  68. Linda Moon - June 17, 2020 4:33 pm

    Thank you, Nancy M.

    Reply
  69. Lori - June 18, 2020 2:23 am

    My heartfelt thanks to you for your blog – a daily blessing. Peace be with you!

    Reply

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